Parish Bulletin 1st August 2021

St Teresa & St John Southworth Churches, Cleveleys

Fr Chris Cousens—Phone: 853340

Rev Bernard Ward (Deacon) (Tel: 858346) 

Enquiries for St John Southworth: Phone: 853340

1 August 2021

http://www.st-teresas-church.co.uk

Email: st.teresas.cleveleys@gmail.com

Lancaster Roman Catholic Diocesan Trustees Registered Charity Number 23433             

Sunday : 18th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Contents:  ​Gospel Reflection

Notices 

Reflections for the coming week

Gospel

John 6:24-35

When the people saw that neither Jesus nor his disciples were there, they got into boats and crossed to Caephernaum to look for Jesus.  When they found him on the other side, they said to him, ‘Rabbi, when did you come here?’  Jesus answered:

​‘I tell you solemnly,

​You are not looking for me

​Because you have seen the signs

​But because you have had all the bread you wanted to eat

​Do not work for food that cannot last,

​But work for food that endures to eternal life,

​The kind of food the Son of Man is offering you,

​For on him the Father, God himself, has set his seal.’

They said to him, ‘What must we do if we are to do the works that God wants?’  Jesus gave them this answer, ‘This is working for God: you must believe in the one he has sent.’ So they said, ‘What sign will you give to show us that we should believe in you?  What work will you do?  Our fathers had manna to eat in the desert as scripture says: He gave them bread from heaven to eat.’

​Jesus answered:

​‘I tell you most solemnly,

​It was not moses who gave you bread from heaven,

​It is my Father who gives you the bread from heaven,

​The true bread;

​For the bread of God

​Is that which comes down from heaven

​And gives life to the world.’

‘Sir,’ they said ‘give us that bread always.’  Jesus answered:

​‘I am the bread of life.

​He who comes to me will never be hungry;

​He who believes in me will never thirst.

Gospel Reflection : “I Am The Bread of Life”

Perhaps we could imagine them saying “He’s talking about bread again. Yes – bread, again!”. Jesus often mentions bread, the staple of life to so many. In the years before Jesus, bread was understood as a gift from heaven. Jesus is the new Bread of heaven, and of life.

The meaning expanded over time, and when Jesus talks about giving the bread of life he is talking of his Word as well as the Eucharist. The Word of God we find in our Scriptures feeds the mind and soul, giving meaning to life, giving us a way of life, and encouraging us to live our lives in the spirit of the Gospel.

In the first part of every Mass we prepare ourselves to receive the Eucharistic bread. Catholics for years stressed Holy Communion over the Word of God. We sometimes talked about ‘getting Communion’, ignoring the first part of the Eucharist, while in reality both are essential to our Christian life. In fact our daily life is well helped by reading the Gospel every day..

Maybe we can list sometime the words of the Bible, and especially the Gospels, which do enlighten our lives, and keep us in touch with God. The Jewish people wore the words “The Lord is our God, the Lord alone”, called the Shema, around their neck, touching them often to keep in touch with the Lord.

We Remember In Our Prayers   Rita Lawson whose Funeral was last week, and Terry Fielding, John’s wife, whose Funeral Mass is at St. Teresa’s this Monday, 2nd August, at 11 am. We remember them and their families, and all those whose anniversaries are at this time. May they be in God’s peace.

Ministers of the Word (Readers at Mass), please will you kindly collect your new readers list/rota from the back of church.

The Daily Mass Times At Both Our Churches : 

Weekdays  :  St. Teresa’s  :  Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday   9.30 am

                      St. John Southworth : Wednesday  9.30 am

Sundays       St, Teresa;s  :  Saturday (Vigil Mass)  6.30 pm, Sunday 9 am, and 10.30 am (live-streamed)

St. John Southworth  Sunday  5pm

(NB  This Monday, 2nd August, there is no 9.30 am Mass. The daily Mass on that day is the Funeral Mass for Terry Fielding, John’s wife, at 11 am)

100 Club Winners For July :

Tom Holland  £15;  Mary Lyon  £10;  Alexandra Miller  £5

The Bread of Life Needs Our Cooperation

The bread that feeds the body :

grown, harvested,

baked, prepared

by human hands.

The bread of God :

grown, harvested,

baked, prepared

by the hands of God and our hands.

The bread of Jesus

is the compassion of God for us, his people;

the friendship and the forgiveness of God.

The aroma of fresh bread can fill a house,

and the fragrance of God’s presence fills our lives,

especially when we most need it :

the peace of God at times of death,

the justice of God during hunger and homelessness,

the closeness of God when we feel lonely.

There could be no bread of life

without our cooperation.

And we bake that bread for the world.

We are grateful for the gift of Jesus,

for God’s love in prayer,

and for the care of God

experienced in the care of others.

But as we hear the words of Jesus –

“I am the bread of life” –

may we also say,

with courage and with thanks :

We are the bread of life too”

Daily Reflections for this week

Monday (Fr. Richard Rohr)

The Good News is always pointing to the future, to someplace new, to the Promised Land. It never points backward except to validate the call to faith in God’s future. This is the irony of Christian history: much of it has been looking backward to the good old days of faith and miracles, back to when “God was God”, when the great prophets lived. How did the word of God become this conservative thing, holding us to the (usually recent) past? The word always points us to the future and calls us out of our own idol-making and insecurities to the security and future God will create. Faith is the security to be insecure.

Scripture (Exodus 16:2-4, 15)

On the fifteenth day of the second month after they had set out from Egypt, the whole community of Israelites began complaining about Moses and Aaron in the desert and said to them, ‘Why did we not die at the Lord’s hand in Egypt, when we were able to sit down to pans of meat and eat bread to our heart’s content! As it is, you have brought us into this desert to starve this entire assembly to death!’ Then the Lord said to Moses, ‘Look, I shall rain down bread for you from the heavens. Each day, the people must go out and collect their ration for the day; I propose to test them in this way to see if they will follow my law or not.’ The next morning the Israelites said ‘What is that?’ ‘That,’ Moses told them,’ is the bread the Lord has given you to eat.’

Tuesday (St. John of the Cross)

In order to come to pleasure you have not, you must go by a way that you will enjoy not. To come to the knowledge that you have not, you must go by a way that you know not. To come to the possession that you have not, you must go by a way that you possess not. To come to be what you are not, you must go by a way that you are not.

Scripture (Ephesians 4:17-18,22-24)

So I say this to you and urge you in the name of the Lord, do not go on living the aimless kind of life that pagans live. That is hardly the way you have learned from Christ, unless you have failed to hear him properly when you were taught what the truth is in Jesus. You must put aside your old self, which belongs to your old way of life and is corrupted by following illusory desires. Your mind is renewed in spirit so that you can put on the new self that has been created in God’s way, in the uprightness and holiness of the truth.

Wednesday (“Soul of Christ” -Traditional) 

Jesus, may all that is you flow into me. May your body and blood be my food and drink. May your passion and death be my strength and life. Jesus, with you by my side, enough has been given. May the shelter I seek be the shadow of your cross. Let me not run from the love which you offer, but hold me safe from the forces of evil. On each of my dyings, shed your light and your love. Keep calling me until that day comes, when, with your saints, I may praise you forever. Amen.

Scripture (Hebrews 13: 7-9,14)

Remember the first leaders of your community, who preaches the word of God to you, and as you reflect on the outcome of their lives, take their faith as your model. Jesus Christ is the same today as he was yesterday and as he will be for ever. Don’t be led astray by all sorts of strange doctrines: it is better to rely on grace for inner strength than on food, which has done no good to those who concentrate on it. There is no permanent city for us here; we are looking for the one which is yet to be.

Thursday (Meister Eckhart)

Whoever does not truly have God within themselves but must constantly receive him in one external thing after another, seeking God in diverse ways, whether by particular works, people or places, such a person does not possess God. The least thing can impede them, for they do not have God and do not seek, love and intend him alone. It is not only bad company but also good company that can obstruct them, not only the street but also the church, not only evil words and deeds but also good words and deeds, for the obstruction lies within themselves since in them God has not become all things. If this were the case, they would be at peace in all places and with all people, for they would possess God and then no one would be able to take him away from them nor impede them in their work.

Scripture (Jn. 6:24-29)

The crowd got into the boats and crossed to Capernaum to look for Jesus. When they found him, Jesus said“In truth I tell you, you are looking for me not because you have seen the signs but because you had all the bread you wanted to eat. Do not work for food that cannot last, but work for food that endures for eternal life, which the Son of man will give you, for on him the Father, God himself, has set his seal.” Then they said to him “What must we do if we are to carry out God’s work?” Jesus gave them this answer, “This is carrying out God’s work: you must believe in the one he has sent. I am the bread of life. No one who comes to me will ever hunger, no one who believes in me will ever thirst.”

Friday (1st Epistle of Clement)

Through Christ we see God’s face as in a mirror, spotless, exalted. Through Christ the eyes of our heart have been opened. Through Christ our dim and clouded understanding unfolds like a flower towards the light. Through Christ the Lord of the universe willed that we should taste the knowledge of eternity. For he is the very brilliance of the rays that shine from God’s majesty.

Scripture (Colossians 1:15-18)

He is the image of the unseen God, the first born of all creation, for in him were created all things in heaven and on earth: everything visible and invisible, thrones, ruling forces, sovereignties, powers—all things were created through him and for him. He exists before all things, and in him all things hold together, and he is the head of the Body, that is, the Church.

Martin Bennett

Parish Bulletin 25th July 2021

St Teresa & St John Southworth Churches, Cleveleys

Fr Chris Cousens—Phone: 853340

Rev Bernard Ward (Deacon) (Tel: 858346) 

Enquiries for St John Southworth: Phone: 853340

25 July 2021

http://www.st-teresas-church.co.uk

Email: st.teresas.cleveleys@gmail.com

Lancaster Roman Catholic Diocesan Trustees Registered Charity Number 234

Contents:  ​Gospel Reflection

Notices 

Reflections for the coming week

Gospel

John 6:1-15

Jesus went off to the other side of the Sea of Galilee – or of Tiberian and a large crowd followed him, impressed by the signs he gave by curing the sick.  Jesus climbed the hillside, and sat down there with his disciples. It was shortly before the Jewish feast of Passover.

Looking up, Jesus saw the crowds approaching and said to Philip, ‘Where can we buy some bread for these people to eat?’  He only said this to test Philip; he himself knew exactly what he was going to do.  Philip answered, ‘Two hundred Denari would only buy enough to give them a small piece each.’  One of his disciples Andrew, Simon Peter’s brother, said, ‘There is a small boy here with five barley loaves and two fish; but what was that between so many?’ Jesus said to them, ‘Make the people sit down.’  There was plenty of grass there, and as many as five thousand men sat down.  Then Jesus took the loaves, gave thanks, and gave them out to all who were sitting ready; he then did the same with the fish, giving out as much as was wanted.  When they had eaten enough he said to the disciples, ‘Pick up the pieces left over, so that nothing gets wasted,’ So they picked them up, and filled twelve baskets with scraps left over from the meal of five barley loaves.  The people seeing this sign that he had given, said. ‘This really is the prophet who is to come into the world.’  Jesus, who could see they were about to come and take him by force and make him king, escaped back into the hills by himself.

Gospel Reflection : The love of God is a generous love, which asks us to make his generosity visible by the way we treat others

The generosity of Jesus is never exhausted. He is like the host or hostess who seems to prepare too much. He fed the crowd, and much was left over. The disciples collected the leftover fragments, and we might say that what was left over would be the bread of life for the world, for all time. Of course what Jesus gave to the crowds who came to him was himself, and that is what is given at every Mass.

But the Eucharist is not just eating, it is sharing. The people sat in groups, and maybe they shared with each other. They didn’t just come up and get a piece of bread or a fish. They ate together, and all had the same menu. Over the last eighteen months some of us came to realise that the Mass under Covid regulations in our churches lacked the personal touch and the sharing. That may certainly be true for those who could only be with us on-line, however much we appreciated the ability to do that.

We could wonder if the people in that big crowd with Jesus knew where the bread and fish actually came from. The bread and the fish, the food of the poor, was shared by that young boy. The boy could probably only have afforded enough for himself. Still, he gave it away!

This week we can of course give thanks for the bread of the Eucharist, but we can also be so grateful for all those who have helped people, in these hard times, who have really struggled to get food or afford it. Those ‘helpers’ have done a truly holy and miraculous thing themselves!

We Remember In Our Prayers  Phyllis Richardson whose Funeral was last week, Rita Lawson whose Funeral Service is at St. Teresa’s on Monday, 26th July at 10 am, and Terry Fielding (John’s wife), whose Funeral Mass is at St.Teresa’s on Monday, 2nd August, at 11 am. We remember them and their families, and all those whose anniversaries are at this time. May they be in God’s peace.

Ministers of the Word (Readers at Mass), please will you kindly collect your new readers list/rota from the back of church.

From this week the Daily Mass times are reverting back to how we had them in pre-Covidtimes. So  :

Weekdays  :  St. Teresa’s  :  Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday   9.30 am

                      St. John Southworth : Wednesday  9.30 am

Sundays       St, Teresa;s  :  Saturday (Vigil Mass)  6.30 pm, Sunday 9 am, and 10.30 am (live-streamed)

                     St. John Southworth  Sunday  5pm

(Please note : because of Rita Lawson’s Funeral Service at 10 am this Monday (26th) there is no Mass that day)

He Fed The Crowd

A mother and small child stood in line for Holy Communion.

The child was too young for Communion

so just trailed by the hand,

and then looked up at the person distributing the Host

with a big open mouth.

And the gospel came alive

with the need of the people for food,

and hands open for the bread of life.

The image of this child, sometimes experienced for real in our churches,

is an image of the gospel,

as Jesus feeds the people in the crowd.

The gift of the bread of life is

about being open and being fed –

people hungry on their journey,

and hungry for sustenance in life.

What is it that Jesus gives that we need?

A meaning to life that is full,

a love that somehow gives fullness.

There is a lot of emptiness around :

superficial relationships, and the need for real love,

selfish fantasies, and the need of positive care for others,

various addictions, and the need for self-love.

And don’t we need to be like that child –

not afraid to be open,

wide and spontaneous.

Just that open mouth said more than all the words,

a gesture which symbolised how our world could be,

and should be, before our God.

Daily Reflections for this week

 Monday (Thomas Merton)

Everyone of us forms an idea of Christ that is limited and incomplete. It is cut according to our own measure. We tend to create for ourselves a Christ in our own image, a projection of our own aspirations, desires and ideals. We find in him what we want to find. We make him not only the incarnation of God but also the incarnation of the things we and our society and our part of society happen to live for .We read the Gospels not merely to get a picture or an idea of Christ but to enter in and pass through the words of revelation to establish, by faith, a vital contact with the Christ who dwells in our souls as God.

Scripture (John 6: 5-13)

Looking up, Jesus saw the crowds approaching and said to Philip “Where can we buy some bread for these people to eat?” He said this only to put Philip to the test; he himself knew exactly what he was going to do. Philip answered “Two hundred denarii would not buy them enough to give them a little piece each.” One of his 

disciples, Andrew, Simon Peter’s brother, said “Here is a small boy with five barley loaves and two fish; but what is that among so many?” Jesus said to them “Make the people sit down.” There was plenty of grass and as many as five thousand men sat down. Then Jesus took the loaves, gave thanks and distributed them to those who were sitting there. He then did the same with the fish, distributing as much as they wanted. The disciples fill twelve large baskets with scraps left over from the meal of five barley loaves.

Tuesday (Anthony de Mello, SJ)

(Note to self: remember this when you think you understand God)

An elephant was enjoying a leisurely dip in a jungle pool when a rat came up and insisted that the elephant get out. “I won’t,” said the elephant. “I insist you get out this minute,” said the rat. “Why?” asked the elephant. “Never mind why, just get out,” said the rat. The elephant, realising he would get no peace, finally lumbered out of the pool. “Now tell me why you wanted me to get out of the pool” he said. “I wanted to see if you were wearing my swimming trunks,” said the rat.

Scripture (Ecclesiasticus 18:4-7)

He has given no one the power to proclaim his works to the end, and who can fathom his magnificent deeds? Who can assess his magnificent strength and who can go further and tell of his mercies? Nothing can be added to them, nothing subtracted, it is impossible to fathom the marvels of the Lord. When someone finishes, they are only beginning, and when they stop they are as puzzled as ever.

Wednesday (Evelyn Underhill)

For the most part, of course, the presence and action of the great spiritual universe surrounding us is no more noticed by us than the pressure of air on our bodies, or the action of light. Our field of attention is not wide enough for that; our spiritual senses are not sufficiently alert. Most people work so hard developing their correspondence with the visible world, that their power of corresponding with the invisible is left in a rudimentary state. But when, for one reason or another, we begin to wake up a little bit, to lift the nose from the ground and notice that spiritual light, our horizon is widened, our experience is enormously enriched. For now we get an entirely new idea of what it is to be human. Our notions about life, our scale of values, begins to change, and then we do.

Scripture (Romans 11:33-36)

How great are God’s riches! How deep are his wisdom and knowledge! Who can explain his decisions? Who can understand his ways? As scripture says “ Who knows the mind of the Lord? Who is able to give him advice? Who has ever given him anything so that he had to pay it back?” For all things were created by him, and all things exist through him and for him. To God be glory for ever! Amen.

Thursday (A New Catechism)

The Eucharist seems really to be too lovely for our earthly existence—a foreign element in this world. And this is true in a certain sense. Something from the final glory is already among us. God is palpably close. The bread of angels is food on earth. Sacramentally, the profoundest desire of man on earth has already been realised in a certain way. In a word, something of a further stage, something heavenly, is already here.

Scripture (Colossians 1:15-18)

He is the image of the unseen God, the first born of all creation, for in him were created all things in heaven and on earth: everything visible and invisible, thrones, ruling forces, sovereignties, powers—all things were created through him and for him. He exists before all things, and in him all things hold together, and he is the head of the Body, that is, the Church.#

Friday (Carlo Carretto)

When I was only eighteen I entered the dark wood of sin. But then half way through life I was bathed in God’s light, a full searching light which penetrated every corner of my being and filtered through it like sun through the leaves of a forest. I feel immersed in God like a drop in the ocean, like a star in the immensity of night; like a lark in the summer sun or a fish in the sea. More: in God I feel like a child in its mother’s lap, and my finite freedom everywhere touches his being which wraps me round tenderly; my need to grow and expand and my thirst for fulfilment are sated every minute by his living presence.

Scripture (Psalm 106:1-5)

Alleluia! Give thanks to the Lord for he is good, his faithful love is everlasting! Who can recount all the Lord’s triumphs, who can fully voice all his praise? How blessed are those who keep to what is just, whose conduct is always upright! Remember me, Yahweh, in your love for your people. Come near to me with your saving power, let me share the happiness of your chosen ones, let me share the joy of your people, the pride of your heritage. Our ancestors in Egypt never grasped the meaning of your wonders. They did not bear in mind your countless acts of love, but for the sake of his name he saved them to make known his mighty power.

Martin Bennett

Pastoral letter from Bishop Paul relating to Covid-19

COVID Regulations 

A message from Bishop Paul

Although most legal restrictions relating to the Covid pandemic are ending on Monday 19th July, a degree of caution is still needed where a large number of people gather in enclosed spaces, which of course, includes our churches.

Not only is the delta variant of the virus still spreading rapidly, it is also the case that those with supressed immune systems still need a degree of additional protection against the virus.

Whilst in broader society, there may well be those who will welcome 19th July with a complete abandonment of anti-Covid measures, we owe it to others to be prudent in what we do in our churches at this time.

With this in mind, and so that there is some uniformity of practise across our diocese, I would like the following to be adopted in our churches. Most of this is in the C.B.C.E.W. guidance.

General Guidance:

1.       Face coverings should still be worn by all those coming to a church service (exemptions for medical reasons excluded.). Those who do not wish to wear a covering should not be banned from entering, but they should be encouraged to sit a distance away from other people.

2.      Social distancing will not be mandatory in our churches; however larger churches might consider still keeping some social distancing in place. Alternatively, if you have a building that can keep a section for those who would feel safer and less vulnerable by maintaining socially distanced sitting, then you could do so.

3.      Hand sanitising will remain necessary as people arrive.

4.      The numbers for weddings, funerals and baptisms are limited by the capacity of each building.

5.      There is no longer a requirement to clean benches etc. between services; however, it will remain best practice to at least clean bench tops if there are two services on the same day. Frequently-touched surfaces, such as door handles should continue to be cleaned regularly.

Liturgical issues:

1.       Holy Communion (in the hand) should be restored to its traditional place and with a Communion procession (trying to accommodate those who wish to retain social distancing.) It is recommended that stewards are used to invite people to the Communion procession row by row.

2.      Communion on the tongue is permissible, and it should take place at the end of Communion, rather than after Mass, and the priests must use sanitiser after each communicant has presented themselves.

3.      Holy Communion under both kinds will not be re-introduced at this time.

4.      Singing can be restored, though you may need to consider if this works with face coverings. C.B.C.E.W. recommends a phased re-introduction of singing. Hymn books and service books can be used once in a day.

5.      The collection basket/plate should still not be passed around, though collectors may move around with baskets, as previously advised.

6.      The Procession of Gifts may be reinstated.

7.      The Gloria, Creed, Prayers of the Faithful and Second Reading should be re-introduced if any of these has been omitted. However, Mass should still not be unnecessarily long.

8.     A Sign of Peace involving contact with other persons should remain suspended.

9.      We need to wait a little longer before the re-introduction of holy water in the stoups.

10.  The dispersal of people immediately after Mass should be orderly.

Yours sincerely in Christ

+Paul Swarbrick

Bishop of Lancaster

Parish Bulletin 18th July 2021

St Teresa & St John Southworth Churches, Cleveleys

Fr Chris Cousens—Phone: 853340

Rev Bernard Ward (Deacon) (Tel: 858346) 

Enquiries for St John Southworth: Phone: 853340

18 July 2021

http://www.st-teresas-church.co.uk

Email: st.teresas.cleveleys@gmail.com

Lancaster Roman Catholic Diocesan Trustees Registered Charity Number 23433

                                      16th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Contents:  ​Gospel Reflection

Notices 

Reflections for the coming week

Gospel

Mark 6:30-34

The apostles rejoined Jesus and told him all they had done and taught.  Then he said to them, ‘You must come away to some lonely place all by yourselves and rest for a while’; for there were so many coming and going that the apostles had no time even to eat.  So they went off in a boat to a lonely place where they could be by themselves.  But people saw them going, and many could guess where; and from every town they all hurried to take place on foot and reached it before them.  So as he stepped ashore he saw a large crowd; and he took pity on them because they were like sheep without a shepherd, and he set himself to teach them at some length.

Gospel Reflection : Barnacle Bill

In earlier Space exploration, the rocket ‘Pathfinder’ and the buggy ‘Sojourner’ sent back photographs from the Red Planet that made us gasp, even though no Martians materialised! It was a journey into the unknown.

The scientists back on earth focused on a boulder which they called ‘Barnacle Bill’, because they were puzzled how it had become attached to the surface.

Perhaps the whole experiment can be interpreted as a parable of what is happening in the inner space of our conscious and subconscious minds.

With the Gospels as our pathfinders, and as we probe deeply into the recesses of our minds, we become aware of aspects of our personality which perhaps have been previously hidden.

It may make us gasp to find barnacles attached to our motivations in life, of which we have been quite unaware. Jesus took his disciples aside to reflect on their motives for following him into the unknown.

We Remember In Our Prayers  Rita Fraser whose Funeral was last week, Phyllis Richardson whose Funeral Mass is at St. Teresa’s at 10.15 am on Thursday 22nd July, Rita Lawson whose Funeral Service is at St Teresa’s on Monday, 26th July at 10 am, and Terry Fielding (John’s wife) who sadly died this Saturday morning, after a short illness. We remember them and their families, and all those whose anniversaries are at this time. May they be in God’s peace.

The Special Collection This Weekend is the annual collection for the Good Shepherd Fund.

Family Prayer Resources for Summer :  CAFOD, the Catholic Agency For Overseas Development in this country, are kindly offering a prayer focus for each week of the summer holidays, with some simple ideas designed to help parents explore faith with their children, in solidarity with our global family. This will be available from mid- July at https://cafod.org.uk/Pray/Prayer-resources

For this coming week the Mass Times for both our churches remain the same as we have had recently

Sundays :  St. Teresa’s  :  Saturday Vigil Mass 6.30 pm, Sunday 9.00 am and 10.30am (live streamed)

                   St. John Southworth : 5 pm

Weekdays : St. Teresa’s : Mondays and Fridays 9.30 am

                     St. John Southworth :  Wednesdays 9.30 am

Be Kind To Yourself

How hard we can be on the person closest to us –

that is, hard on ourselves.

We all need a bit of compassion for ourselves,

for our weaknesses, faults and failings.

We also need to be able to forgive ourselves.

We can be so hard on ourselves that we’re tough on everyone else.

Can we accept ourselves as the people we are?

That’s having compassion on ourselves.

We can be hard on ourselves at all ages,

For not being good enough,

failing to reach impossible standards,

for having feelings like jealousy or envy.

And regrets – everything you wanted to happen and it didn’t,

or maybe ways you let people down, even those closest to you.

Jesus was big on compassion. And we need it.

Look on our whole selves, not just on one side of ourselves.

If you have harmed people and they forgive you,

allow yourself to be forgiven,

and let the compassion of Jesus give you sympathy for yourself.

Accept yourself. Love yourself as you are,

not as you might have been, or might be,

for that is how God looks on you.

Daily Reflections for this week

 Monday (St. Teresa of Avila)

When you have received our Lord, since he really dwells within you, try to close the eyes of your body and open those of your soul; look into your heart I have told you, and shall tell you again and again, that if you accustom yourself to keep with him when you communicate, his coming will not be so hidden but that, in many ways, he will reveal himself in proportion to the desire you have of seeing him. If we care nothing for him, or busy ourselves about other and lower matters what would we have him do? Must he drag us by force to look at him and stay with him? He will not show himself openly except to those who desire him.

Scripture (Mark 6:30-34)

The apostles rejoined Jesus and told him all they had done and taught, and he said to them ‘Come away to some lonely place all by yourselves and rest for a while’; for there were so many coming and going that there was no time for them even to eat. So they went off in a boat to a lonely place where they could be by themselves. But people saw them going and many recognised them; and from every town they all hurried to the place on foot and reached it before them. So as he stepped ashore he saw a large crowd; and he took pity on them because they were like sheep without a shepherd, and he set himself to teach them at some length.

Tuesday (Caryll Houselander)

There was one dazzling moment, upon Mount Tabor, when those apostles who were to see Christ in his dereliction, suddenly and briefly saw the radiance of his divinity: He was transfigured. The apostles knew Christ as a man, one in whose presence they were remarkably at ease; in that moment they saw his glory, the very garments that he wore burning with his beauty. That is God’s way with us, to hide and reveal himself at the same time; to show his desire for man’s love, making himself accessible, even ordinary, that he may come close, yet at the same time playing a game of hide and seek, saying, “seek and you shall find”. God does not force his secrets upon us; he does not force his love upon us.

Scripture (John 14:7-11)

Philip said, ‘Lord, show us the Father and then we shall be satisfied.’ Jesus said to him, Have I been with you all this time and you still do not know me? Anyone who has seen me has seen the Father, so how can you say, “Show us the Father”? Do you not believe that I am in the Father and the Father is in me? What I say to you I do not speak of my own accord: it is the Father, living in me, who is doing his works. You must believe me when I say that I am in the Father and the Father is in me; or at least believe it on the evidence of these works.

Wednesday (Dietrich Bonhoeffer)

This is what we mean when we speak of Christ dwelling in our hearts. His life on earth is not finished yet, for he continues to live in the lives of his followers. Indeed, it is wrong to speak of the Christian life: we should rather speak of Christ living in us. Jesus Christ, incarnate, crucified and glorified has entered my life and taken charge. And where Christ lives, there the Father also lives, and both Father and Son through the Holy Spirit.

Scripture ( Galatians 2:20)

I have been crucified with Christ, and yet I am alive; yet it is no longer I, but Christ living in me. The life that I am now living, subject to the limitation of human nature, I am living in faith, faith in the Son of God who loved me and gave himself for me.

Thursday (Pope Francis, Gaudete et Exsultate)

[We must not ignore] the need for moments of quiet, solitude and silence before God. Quite the contrary. The presence of constantly new gadgets, the excitement of travel and an endless array of consumer goods at times leave no room for God’s voice to be heard. We are overwhelmed by words, by superficial pleasures and by an increasing din, filled not by joy but rather by the discontent of those whose lives have lost meaning. How can we fail to realize the need to stop this rat race and to recover the personal space needed to carry on a heartfelt dialogue with God? Finding that space may prove painful, but it is always fruitful. Sooner or later, we have to face our true selves and let the Lord enter.

Scripture (Jeremiah 23:2-4)

This, therefore, is what the Lord, the God of Israel, says about the shepherds who shepherd my people “You have scattered my flock, you have driven them away and not taken care of them. Right, I shall take care of you for your misdeeds, the Lord declares! But the remnant of my flock I myself shall gather from all the countries where I have driven them and bring them back to their folds; they will be fruitful and increase in numbers. For them, I shall raise up shepherds to shepherd them and pasture them. No fear, no terror for them anymore. Not one shall be lost, Yahweh declares!

Friday (Bede Griffiths)

Through all these years I thought I had been seeking God. The presence which had appeared to me beneath the forms of nature that day at school; the beauty I had found in the poets; the truth which philosophy had opened to me; and finally the revelation of Christianity; all these had seemed to be steps on my way, of ascent to God. Now I suddenly saw that all the time it was not I who had been seeking God, but God who had been seeking me. 

Scripture ( John 10: 14-16)

I am the good shepherd; I know my own and my own know me, just as the Father knows me and I know the Father; and I lay down my life for my sheep. And there are other sheep that I have that are not of this fold, and I must lead these too. They too will listen to my voice, and there will be only one flock, one shepherd.

Martin Bennett

Parish Bulletin 11th July 2021

t Teresa & St John Southworth Churches, Cleveleys

Fr Chris Cousens—Phone: 853340

Rev Bernard Ward (Deacon) (Tel: 858346)

Enquiries for St John Southworth: Phone: 853340

11 July 2021

http://www.st-teresas-church.co.uk

Email: st.teresas.cleveleys@gmail.com

Lancaster Roman Catholic Diocesan Trustees Registered Charity Number 23433

 

Sunday :  15th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Contents:     Gospel Reflection

Notices

Reflections for the coming week

Gospel

Mark 6:7-13

Jesus summoned the twelve and began to send them out in pairs giving them authority over the unclean spirits.  And he instructed them to take nothing for the journey except a staff – no bread, no haversack, no coppers for their purses.  They were to wear sandals but, he added, ‘Do not take a spare tunic.’  And he said to them, ‘If you enter a house anywhere, stay there until you leave the district.  And if any place does not welcome you and people refuse to listen to you, as you walk away shake off the dust from under your feet as a sign to them.’  So they set off to preach repentance, and they cast out many devils, and anointed many sick people with oil and cured them.

Gospel Reflection :    ‘Sent Out’ – If Only That Somebody May Be Saved By The Bell

One day I rang a doorbell

In a casual sort of way.

It was not a formal visit,

And there wasn’t much to say.

I can’t remember what I said –

It matters not I guess –

But I  found a heart in hunger,

A soul in some distress.

He said I came from Heaven,

And I’ve often wondered why;

He said I’d called to see him

When no other help came by.

It meant so little to me

To knock at a neighbour’s door,

But it meant the world to him,

God’s world, His peace, and more.

We Remember In Our Prayers  Philip Mateley whose Funeral was last week, Rita Fraser whose Funeral Service is at Lytham Crematorium on Monday, 12th July, and Phyllis Richardson whose Funeral Mass is at St. Teresa’s on Thursday, 22nd July. We remember them and their families, and all those whose anniversaries are at this time. May they be in God’s peace.

This Sunday Is Sea Sunday  when the Church prays for all those who live and work at sea. Many of us have never stopped to consider how important seafarers are to our own standard of living. Without them we would not have most of the items we use in our everyday lives. Many of these seafarers are unable to practice their Faith due to long periods away from home, whilst others can be denied basic rights and working conditions that we take for granted. The special collection which is taken this Sunday is our opportunity to support the work of the Apostleship of the Sea (AoS), the official maritime welfare agency of the Catholic Church in the United Kingdom. This annual collection is absolutely vital to enable AoS to continue its work with seafarers.  Please give generously and remember seafarers in your prayers. Thank you. For more information on the work of AoS please visit their website at www.apostleshipofthesea.org.uk

We Welcome Into The Family Of The Church  Marnie Leia Aplin whose Baptism took place at St. Teresa’s last Sunday, and Lyra Rose Bowd whose Baptism is at St. Teresa’s this Sunday.

100 Club Winners For June  :  David Brimelow  £15,  Veronica Brady  £10,  Frances O’Mara  £5

Family Prayer Resources for Summer :  CAFOD, the Catholic Agency For Overseas Development in this country, are kindly offering a prayer focus for each week of the summer holidays, with some simple ideas designed to help parents explore faith with their children, in solidarity with our global family. This will be available from mid- July at https://cafod.org.uk/Pray/Prayer-resources

Sent Out In Pairs

In the centre of our lives,

of every day and week,

in work and in the home,

we live in a circle of relationships.

We know that problems are diminished

and burdens lightened,

by sharing them with another.

Decisions come more easily when we talk them over,

suffering is lessened by the comfort of someone else.

And whenever we meet

in the name of Jesus,

in the name of love,

in the name of justice,

He is with us.

To preach His word,

He sent His disciples in pairs,

for we do not live our faith alone.

Like a river gathers its fullness

from the smaller rivers flowing into it,

we grow in faith from the faith of others.

In prayer together,

in sharing struggles of faith,

in helping another in sorrow,

in gathering together to work for justice –

whether in pairs or larger groups –

we are engaged in the work of Jesus,

the one who worked with and sent others

on his work of God.

Donal Neary S.J.

Daily Reflections for this week

 Monday (Henri Nouwen)

Do you really want to be converted? Are you willing to be transformed? You have to trust the inner voice that shows you the way. You know that inner voice—you turn to it often. But after you have heard with clarity what you are to do, you start raising questions, fabricating objections and seeking everyone else’s opinion. Then you become entangled in countless, often contradictory thoughts, feelings and ideas and lose touch with the God in you. And you end up dependent on all the people you have gathered around you. Only by tending constantly to the inner voice can you be converted to a new life of freedom and joy.

Scripture (Mark 6:7-13)

Jesus summoned the twelve and began to send them out in pairs giving them authority over the unclean spirits. And he instructed them to take nothing with them except a staff—no bread, no bag, no money for their purses. They were to wear sandals but, he added, “Do not take a spare tunic.” And he said to them “ If you enter a house anywhere, stay there until you leave the district. And if any place does not welcome you, as you walk away shake the dust from under your feet as a sign to them.” So they set off to preach repentance; and they cast out many devils, and anointed many sick people with oil and cured them.

Tuesday (C.S.Lewis)

Everyone has noticed how hard it is to turn our thoughts to God when everything is going well with us. We “have all we want” is a terrible saying when “all” does not include God. We find God an interruption. Now God, who has made us, knows what we are and that our happiness lies in him. Yet we will not seek him as long as he leaves us any other resort where it can be plausibly looked for. While what we call ’our own life’ remains agreeable, we will not surrender it to him.

Scripture (Deuteronomy 6:10-12)

When Yahweh has brought you into the country which he swore to your ancestors Abraham, Isaac and Jacob that he would give you, with great and prosperous cities you have not built, with houses full of good things you have not provided, with wells you have not dug, with vineyards and olive trees you have not planted, and then, when you have eaten as much as you want, be careful not to forget Yahweh who brought you out of Egypt.

Wednesday (John Henry Newman)

It is one great peculiarity of the Christian character to be dependent. People of the world indeed, in proportion as they are active and enterprising, boast of their independence and are proud of having obligations to no one. But it is the Christian’s excellence to be diligent and watchful, to work and persevere, yet to be in spirit dependent. To be willing to serve and to rejoice in the permission to do so; to be content to view one’s self in a subordinate place; to love to sit in the dust.

Scripture ( 2Cor. 12:7-10)

My grace is enough for you: for power is at full strength in weakness. It is, then, about my weakness that I am happiest of all to boast, so that the power of Christ may rest upon me; and that is when I am glad of weaknesses, insults, constraints, persecutions and distress for Christ’s sake. For it is when I am weak that I am strong.

Thursday (Cardinal Basil Hume)

Hints on holiness: remain a little person. By this I mean to remain small in my own estimate of myself. To be unimportant whatever the position I hold or talents I have. It is to remember that only one thing matters, and that is what God thinks about me. To be high in his regard is the highest ambition any person can have. Smile at yourself, your spiritual incompetence. Have a sense of humour. It does not matter if others take you seriously; God will. Keep on trying. That is your part. Success? That is God’s gift.

Scripture: (Jr. 9:22-23)

Yahweh says this, ‘Let the sage not boast of wisdom, nor the valiant of valour, nor the wealthy of riches! But let anyone who wants to boast, boast of this: of understanding and knowing me. For I am Yahweh, who acts with faithful love, justice, and uprightness on earth; yes, these are what please me’ Yahweh declares.

Friday (1st Epistle of Clement)

Anyone who paid you a visit affirmed the quality and steadfastness of your faith. With humility and total lack of arrogance, at the service of others, rather than demanding attention, and gladly giving rather than receiving, you were well satisfied with all that Christ provided, attended carefully to his words, treasuring them in your hearts and keeping his sufferings before your eyes. In this way a deep and rich peace was granted to everyone and a full outpouring of the Holy Spirit came upon all. Holiness was your intent as you stretched out your hands to Almighty God.

Scripture (Phillipians 4:11-12)

I have learned to manage with whatever I have. I know how to live modestly, and I know how to live luxuriously too: in every way now I have mastered the secret of all conditions: full stomach and empty stomach, plenty and poverty. There is nothing I cannot do in the One who strengthens me.

Martin Bennett