Parish Newsletter 24th February 2021

PARISH NEWSLETTER

21 February 2021

Contents:  ​The Gospel Reflection

Notices  (Including details of Live-Streamed Mass)

Reflections for the coming week

Gospel: Mark 1:12-15

The Spirit drove Jesus out into the wilderness and he remained there for forty days, and was tempted by Satan.  He was with the wild beasts, and the angels looked after him.

After John had been arrested, Jesus went into Galilee.  There he proclaimed the Good News from God. ‘The time has come’ he said ‘and the kingdom of God is close at hand.  Repent, and believe the Good News.’

Gospel Reflection: No Matter How Our Goodness Is Tempted, We Are Never Alone

Imagine you are in a dark room and you know there is a light switch somewhere but you can’t find it – like confusion in the night when you wake in a new room. Where is it? Lent is a bit like finding the light- switch of our souls.

The real invitation of Lent is to believe the good news, about the three big messages of Jesus :

God Loves you

We are all brothers and sisters

Good will overcome evil

That was Jesus’ life – his words and how he lived. Just watch him Sunday by Sunday in the Gospel, bringing love, compassion and welcome to all sorts of people.

Jesus saw everyone as a child of his Father, and a brother and sister of himself. Watch him healing, consoling, comforting, even challenging people to a better life experience. And, he showed on Calvary that the terrible cruelty, injustice, and evil was not the end.

Lord, let this light switch on for us this Lent.

Notices (with resources for prayer during Lent, including through CAFOD)

We Remember In Our Prayers  Rita Cullen whose Funeral was last week, Betty Walsh whose Funeral Service is at St. Teresa’s on Monday, 22nd February, Anita Aisbitt whose Funeral is at Carleton Crematorium on Friday, 26th February, Julie Richardson whose Funeral Mass is at St. Teresa’s on Tuesday, 2nd March, and Bernard Mann, whose Funeral has yet to be arranged. We remember them and their families, and all those whose anniversaries are at this time. May they be in God’s peace.

The Live-Streamed Sunday Mass from St. Teresa’s is at 10 am during lockdown. Go to this website address, which you are on now, st-teresas-cleveleys.co.uk, and click on ‘Live Streaming’..

A Prayer That We Can All Say Together At The Time Of Communion At A LIve-Streamed Mass :

My Jesus, I believe that you are in the Blessed Sacrament. 

I love you above all things, 

and I long for you to be with me. 

Since I cannot now receive you sacramentally, 

come spiritually into my heart. 

I embrace you, 

and unite myself to you. 

Never permit me to be separated from you. 

Amen

Live-Streamed Mass From The Cathedral in Lancaster : This Sunday, February 21st, the First Sunday of Lent, there is a Mass broadcast from the Cathedral at 10.30 am. To join please click on to the following :

Main Link

https//vimeo.com/512854495

Back-up Link (ONLY USE IF FOR SOME REASON THE VIMEO LINK FAILS)

https//youtube1lmZtgcxsc

LENT

DO YOU WANT TO FAST THIS LENT?  In the words of Pope Francis  :

“Fast from hurting words and say kind words.

Fast from sadness and be filled with gratitude.

Fast from anger and be filled with patience.

Fast from pessimism and be filled with hope.

Fast from worries and have trust in God.

Fast from complaints; contemplate simplicity.

Fast from pressures and be prayerful.

Fast from bitterness; fill your hearts with joy.

Fast from selfishness and be compassionate.

Fast from grudges and be reconciled.

Fast from words; be silent and listen.” 

The Season of Lent Began last Wednesday, 17th February  Last year our normal celebration of Lent was interrupted after it had begun, because of the first Lockdown caused by  the CovidVirus. This year it is being affected right from the beginning. It is still not safe to gather in church for those extra Lenten occasions we might normally have.. However, at the heart of these seven weeks before Easter is an opportunity for each of us to organise a “spring-time renewal” of our own lives – by doing something extra in our prayer, by giving up something (fasting), and by being generous in our charity for others (almsgiving).. The annual Family Fast Day, organised by CAFOD. brings all three of those elements together. This year the Family Fast Day is on Friday, 26th February, when we are asked to eat simply, and donate what we save, or can manage to give, to CAFOD, who will distribute our gifts to those who have real difficulty in finding any food or water at all.

CAFOD has given us Abdella’s story this year. Abdella leaves his home in Ethiopia early in the morning, before it is fully light, to walk and collect water for his family. It is too hot to make the journey any later. By eight in the morning it is already over 40 degrees. He walks along a dried-out river bed, then climbs into the mountains. He goes down into a valley, then climbs another mountain, until he reaches the water. There he fills his jerry cans, taking them back down one at a time to where his donkeys are waiting, before he begins the long walk home.

Abdella says, “I don’t have any more words to express how hard this is. I’m so tired, I’m struggling to give you words. The journey for water is so long.” Without water he cannot make plans for his future.

This Lent let us walk alongside Abdella, and the millions of other people like him who do not have access to safe drinking water. Let us do what we can to make a difference, to bring relief in these desert places, so that people do not have to spend all their time walking to collect water, and can instead concentrate on making their hopes a reality.

Please go to cafod.org.uk/Fundraise/Family-Fast-Day which includes a Lent Calendar and prayer card, the ‘Walk for Water’ scheme where we can be involved with and for Abdella next weekend, and ways of donating. For those who prefer to hand in their donation to CAFOD in an envelope, you can always do so through the presbytery letter box. As always Sue Ward will be collating the donations, as our parish CAFOD representative.

Please note :  The CAFOD Lent Calendar 2021 gives us the good opportunity to reflect and pray each day of Lent. It can also be found at cafod.org.uk/Pray/Lent Calendar, where you will also be given the opportunity to download a Lent Calendar for Children, and a Lent Calendar for Young People.

Daily Reflections for this week

Monday (Thomas Merton)

This, then, is what it means to seek God perfectly: to withdraw from illusion and pleasure, from worldly anxieties and desires, from the works that God does not want, from a glory that is only human display; to keep my mind free from confusion in order that my liberty may always be at the disposal of His will; to entertain silence in my heart and listen for the voice of God; to have a will that is always ready to fold back within itself and draw all the powers of the soul down from its deepest centre, poised in concentration upon the point of my dependence on Him.

Scripture (Mark 1:12-15)

After his Baptism, the Spirit drove Jesus out into the wilderness and he remained there for forty days, and was tempted by Satan. He was with the wild beasts, and the angels looked after him.After John had been arrested, Jesus went into Galilee. There he proclaimed the Good News from God. “The time has come” he said “and the kingdom of God is close at hand. Repent, and believe the Good News.

Tuesday (Bede Griffiths)

For the first time I felt an overwhelming need to repent. I did not clearly understand what repentance was, nor was I aware of any particular sin of which I had to repent. My religion was based on my own reason and my own will. Now I was being summoned to surrender this independence. Something had risen in the depths of my own reason which I was powerless to control. I was being called to surrender the very citadel of myself. I had to surrender myself into the hands of a power which was above my reason, which would not allow me to argue, but commanded me to obey.

Scripture (Psalm 119 1-2,10-11,15-16)

How blessed are those whose way is blameless, who walk in the Law of Yahweh! Blessed are those who seek his instructions with all their hearts. With all my heart I seek you, in my heart I treasure your promises, to avoid sinning against you. In the way of your instructions lies my joy, a joy beyond all wealth. I will ponder your precepts and fix my gaze on your paths. I find my delight in your will, I do not forget your words.

Wednesday (Thomas a Kempis)

The true, inward lover of Jesus and the Truth, who is free from inordinate desires, can turn freely to God, rise above self and joyfully rest in God. Those who knows things at their true worth, and not as they are said or reputed to be, are truly wise, for their knowledge comes from God and not from man. They who walk by an inner light, and are not unduly influenced by outward things are hindered and distracted by such things only so far as they allow themselves to be concerned by them.

Scripture (Eph 4:17– 22)

So I say this to you and attest to you in the Lord, do not go on living the empty-headed life of those who, intellectually, are in the dark and are estranged from the life of God because of the ignorance of closed minds. Now that is hardly the way you have learnt Christ, unless you have failed to hear him properly when you were taught what the truth is in Jesus. You were to put aside your old self, which belongs to your old way of life and is 

corrupted by following illusory desires. Your mind was to be renewed in spirit, so that you could put on the New Man that has been created on God’s principles, in the uprightness and holiness of the truth.

Thursday (Henri Nouwen)

It takes courage to move away from the safe place into the unknown, even when we know that the safe place offers false safety and the unknown promises us a saving intimacy with God. We realise quite well that giving up the familiar and reaching out to him who transcends all our mental grasping and clinging makes us vulnerable. It is a sign of spiritual maturity that we can give up our illusory self-control and stretch out our hands to God.

Scripture (2 Cor. 5:12-21)

So for anyone who is in Christ, there is a new creation: the old order is gone and a new being is there to see. It is all God’s work; he reconciled us to himself through Christ and he gave us the ministry of reconciliation. I mean, God was in Christ reconciling the world to himself, not holding anyone’s faults against them but entrusting to us the message of reconciliation. For our sake he made the sinless one a victim of sin, so that in him we might become the uprightness of God.

Friday (A Carthusian)

The essence of our relations with God here below is faith: faith in his love, which is his being and his life. There is no other remedy for our passing ills than God’s eternal love for us. At bottom, all our sufferings derive from the fact that we want joy and possessions that are altogether too narrow and fleeting for the greatness of our hearts. Nothing unites so much as sacrifice. It offers up as a holocaust all narrowness in us. At the same time it makes us greater, and so makes room for God who is so great, and who loves us with all the immensity of his infinite love. 

Scripture (2 Cor. 5:12-21)

So for anyone who is in Christ, there is a new creation: the old order is gone and a new being is there to see. It is all God’s work; he reconciled us to himself through Christ and he gave us the ministry of reconciliation. I mean, God was in Christ reconciling the world to himself, not holding anyone’s faults against them but entrusting to us the message of reconciliation. For our sake he made the sinless one a victim of sin, so that in him we might become the uprightness of God.

Martin Bennett

Universalis

For those of you who are a little computer-savvy and are thinking of taking something up or giving some of your time to God during Lent, then you could do worse than downloading the Universalis liturgy of the hours app and exploring it. 

It’s a little like the daily missal book but much, much more. We use it at St.Teresa’s to copy the readings of the day and transfer them to the video screen (with permission). It’s not free of charge but you might consider it a good investment. 

Helping CAFOD through Lent

In yesterday’s Parish Newsletter we read about the work CAFOD (Catholic Agency For Overseas Development) is doing to help people like Abdella in Ethiopia. One of the ways the Lancaster based branch of CAFOD, of which we are members, has suggested we can help is to sign up for the 10,000 steps a day challenge. 

You can find out more about it by pressing with your finger or clicking with the left part of your mouse over CAFOD’S Internet address cafod.org.uk and look for the Walk for  Water challenge. Basically you are invited to walk 10,000 steps a day (about 5miles) throughout Lent. You may do it as a sign of solidarity with people like Abdella or you may wish to take it further and use it to raise money for CAFOD. Please see the website for further details. 

Technology update for 14th February 2021

Again, apologies over the audio issues, which we recognise has been the bugbear of our live streaming efforts and is the major impediment for our parishioners. You will notice that there is audio for the readings and sermon, but completely absent from the rest of the Mass. This is because the lapel microphone wire that has been used successfully since November 2020 broke at exactly the time Mass started. You can’t make these things up… We have confirmed this was the issue and are purchasing multiple additional wires for the future, but cannot undue this week.

On the positive side, the video was of high quality with no judder or breaks. This is because the new WiFi system that we installed yesterday worked perfectly today. We have brought high quality broadband wirelessly into St Teresa’s which enables us to stream and provide other digital services simply and with high quality.

All we can do is to communicate what we are doing and when things go wrong, explain clearly what happened and how we will fix it in the future.

Next week, we will concentrate on getting the Mass streaming right and not make any changes to the technology.

Parish Newsletter 14th February 2021

Sunday : Sixth Sunday of Ordinary Time

Contents:  The Gospel Reflection

Notices  (Including details of Live-Streamed Mass)

Reflections for the coming week

Gospel: Mark 1:40-45

A leper came to Jesus and pleaded on his knees ‘If you want to’ he said, ‘you can cure me.’  Feeling sorry for him, Jesus stretched out his hand and touched him.  ‘Of course I want to!’ he said.  ‘Be cured!’  And the leprosy left him at once and he was cured.  Jesus immediately sent him away and sternly ordered him, ‘Mind you say nothing to anyone, but go and show yourself to the priest and make the offering for your healing, prescribed by Moses as evidence of your recovery.’  The man went away, but then started talking about it freely and telling the story everywhere, so that Jesus could no longer go openly into any town, but had to stay outside in places where nobody lived.  Even so, people from all around would come to him.

Gospel Reflection: : A People of Hope

From the very beginning of our existence, from our first baby cries and wrinkled faces, we struggle to make sense of who we are and what we are, and of the strange new furniture of our lives  – of sounds and smells, of warmth and cold, of light and shadow, of hands and faces. We struggle to put together the bits and pieces of our experience into some kind of understandable order. Perhaps when we do so, we can then live with less fear, especially in the midst of forces which can seem to threaten and overwhelm us.

Sometimes, without asking, we want to know from each other : “How do you cope, because at least you seem to?”; and from those who have gone before us : “What can we learn from your experience?”

However much we might like to be left alone at times, none of us want to be foreigners in our own land, strangers to where life is leading us. To be human is to live in a world of meaning. To live without meaning is to be a stranger in the midst of our own human lives.

As in the Gospel today, may the Lord stretch out his hand and bless us, and bring us that healing and wholeness we need to cope with our own situation right now. 

Notices

The Live-Streamed Sunday Mass from St. Teresa’s is at 10 am during lockdown. Go to this website address, which you are on now, st-teresas-cleveleys.co.ukand click on ‘Live Streaming’..

A Prayer That We Can All Say Together At The Time Of Communion At A LIve-Streamed Mass :

My Jesus, I believe that you are in the Blessed Sacrament.

I love you above all things,

and I long for you to be with me.

Since I cannot now receive you sacramentally,

come spiritually into my heart.

I embrace you,

and unite myself to you.

Never permit me to be separated from you.

Amen

We Remember In Our Prayers Rita Cullen whose Funeral Mass is at St. Teresa’s on Thursday,18th February, Betty Walsh whose Funeral is at Carleton Crematorium on Monday 22nd February, and Anita Aisbitt whose Funeral is also at Carleton Crematorium,  on Friday, 26th February. We remember them and their families, and all those whose anniversaries are at this time.  May they rest in God’s peace

The Season of Lent Begins This Wednesday, 17th February  Last year our normal celebration of Lent was interrupted after it had begun, because of the first Lockdown caused by  the Covid Virus. This year it is being affected right from the beginning. It is still not safe to gather in church for those extra Lenten occasions we might normally have.. However, at the heart of these seven weeks before Easter is an opportunity for each of us to organise a “spring-time renewal” of our own lives – by doing something extra in our prayer, by giving up something (fasting), and by being generous in our charity for others (almsgiving).. The annual Family Fast Day, organised by CAFOD. brings all three of those elements together. This year the Family Fast Day is on Friday, 26th February, when we are asked to eat simply, and donate what we save, or can manage to give, to CAFOD, who will distribute our gifts to those who have real difficulty in finding any food or water at all.

CAFOD has given us Abdella’s story this year. Abdella leaves his home in Ethiopia early in the morning, before it is fully light, to walk and collect water for his family. It is too hot to make the journey any later. By eight in the morning it is already over 40 degrees. He walks along a dried-out river bed, then climbs into the mountains. He goes down into a valley, then climbs another mountain, until he reaches the water. There he fills his jerry cans, taking them back down one at a time to where his donkeys are waiting, before he begins the long walk home.

Abdella says, “I don’t have any more words to express how hard this is. I’m so tired, I’m struggling to give you words. The journey for water is so long.” Without water he cannot make plans for his future.

This Lent let us walk alongside Abdella, and the millions of other people like him who do not have access to safe drinking water. Let us do what we can to make a difference, to bring relief in these desert places, so that people do not have to spend all their time walking to collect water, and can instead concentrate on making their hopes a reality.

Please go to cafod.org.uk/Fundraise/Family-Fast-Day which includes a Lent Calendar and prayer card, the ‘Walk for Water’ scheme where we can be involved with and for Abdella next weekend, and ways of donating. For those who prefer to hand in their donation to CAFOD in an envelope, you can always do so through the presbytery letter box. As always Sue Ward will be collating the donations, as our parish CAFOD representative.

Please note :  The CAFOD Lent Calendar 2021 gives us the good opportunity to reflect and pray each day of Lent. It can also be found at cafod.org.uk/Pray/Lent Calendar, where you will also be given the opportunity to download a Lent Calendar for Children, and a Lent Calendar for Young People.

Daily Reflections for this week

Monday (Cardinal Basil Hume)

In searching for meaning and purpose in life, we are trying to catch glimpses of the glory of God. In a great Cathedral like Westminster, it is right that we should use all that is fine and magnificent to give honour and glory to God. But I remember a prison chaplain celebrating mass in a shapeless room made clean and tidy for the occasion. It is no place of beauty and the congregation is composed of the wounded ones of our society; their musical talents minimal, their clothing drab and dull. But God is smiling on them as he does on the congregation of the Cathedral. They, too, are pleasing to God.

Scripture (Isaiah 57:14-15)

Then it will be said “Level up, level up, clear the way, remove the obstacle from my people’s way,” for thus says the High and Exalted One who lives eternally and whose name is holy ‘I live in the holy heights but I am with the contrite and humble, to revive the heart of the contrite.’

Tuesday (John Henry Newman)

When God took flesh and appeared on earth, he showed us the Godhead in a new manifestation. He invested himself with a new set of attributes, those of our flesh, taking into him a human’s soul and body, in order that thoughts, feelings, affections, might be his which could respond to ours. When, then, our Saviour weeps with sympathy, let us not say it is love of a man overcome by natural feeling. It is the love of God, the bowels of compassion, of the almighty and eternal, condescending to show us we are capable of receiving it, in the form of human nature.

Scripture (Mk. 1:40-45)

A man suffering from a virulent skin disease came to him and pleaded on his knees saying “If you want to, you can cleanse me.” Feeling sorry for him, Jesus reached out his hand, touched him and said to him “I am willing. Be cleansed.” And at once the skin disease left him and he was cleansed. The man went away and started talking about it freely, so that Jesus could no longer go openly into any town, but had to stay outside in places where nobody lived. Even so, people from all around would come to him.

Wednesday (Henri Nouwen)

The Lord, whose compassion we want to manifest in time and place, is indeed the displaced Lord. A greater displacement cannot be conceived. The mystery of the incarnation is that God did not remain in the place that was proper for him but moved to the condition of a suffering human being. God gave up his heavenly place and took a humble place among mortal men and women. God displaced himself so that nothing human would be alien to him and he could experience fully the brokenness of our human condition.

Scripture (Philippians 2:5-8)

Make your own the mind of Christ Jesus who, being in the form of God, did not count equality with God something to be grasped. But he emptied himself, taking the form of a slave, becoming as human beings are; and being in every way like a human being, he was humbler yet, even to accepting death, death on a cross.

Thursday (Pope Francis: Evangelii Gaudium)

The Eucharist, although it is the fullness of sacramental life, is not a prize for the perfect but a powerful medicine and nourishment for the weak. The Church is not a tollhouse; it is the house of the Father, where there is a place for everyone, with all their problems.

I prefer a Church which is bruised, hurting and dirty because it has been out on the streets, rather than a Church which is unhealthy from being confined and from clinging to its own security. More than by fear of going astray, my hope is that we will be moved by the fear of remaining shut up within structures which give us a false sense of security, within rules which make us harsh judges, within habits which make us feel safe, while at our door people are starving and Jesus does not tire of saying to us “Give them something to eat”

Scripture (Romans 3:21-24)

God’s saving justice was witnessed by the Law and the

Prophets, but now it has been revealed altogether apart from law: God’s saving justice given through faith in Christ Jesus to all who believe. No distinction is made: all have sinned and lack God’s glory, and all are justified  by the free gift of his grace through being set free in Christ Jesus.

Friday (Thomas Merton)

He “in whom all things consist” was not only to walk with man in the breeze of the afternoon, as he did with Adam, but would also become man and dwell with us as a brother. The Lord would not only love his creation as a Father, but he would enter into his creation, emptying himself, hiding himself, as if he were not God but a creature. Why should he do this? Because he loved his creatures, and he could not bear that his creatures should merely adore him as distant, remote, transcendent and all-powerful. This was not the glory that he sought.

Scripture (Hebrews 2:16-17)

For it was not angels that he took to himself; he took to himself the line of Abraham. It was essential that he should in this way be made completely like his brothers so that he could become a compassionate and trustworthy high priest for their relationship with God, able to expiate the sins of the people.

Martin Bennett

Aiming for Easter- The Video Projector Screen

As many of you will now know, we have also invested in a Video Projector Screen.  

Although these pictures don’t do it full justice it gives you an idea of what it looks like. It has been successfully tried out and I am pleased to say that most people have found it helpful. It means that when sharing the Mass we can keep our eye line more towards what is happening on the altar than our boots and for those of us with poor short sight it is easy to read the Mass readings and responses even from the back of church. As for the future, we hope that when our church does reopen we will also be allowed to sing out the praises of God and to help that we will have the hymn lyrics added to the readings and responses on the screen. Looking beyond Easter it would be nice to have photos on the screen before mass of the people for whom Mass is being said and Wedding and Funeral services might also be enhanced by use of the projector screen. 

Aiming for Easter- Live Streaming

Now we know that, 

barring issues with the sound volume and clarity and picture quality and permanence,

it is possible to live stream a Mass from St Teresa’s into your living rooms. 

Who would have thought 12 months ago that this would be the case.

This has been achieved through the skills and time generously afforded to us by Giles Cook. Initially it was just seen as a 3 week gap filler until lockdown restrictions were removed (ha!ha!). Now it is seen as a vital part of St Teresa’s mission to reach as many people as possible with the message of the Gospels. There is no doubt it will continue beyond the pandemic. 

Believe it or not, the Heath-Robinson technical array you see in the picture below is the most sophisticated setup we have had to date.

Between now and Easter therefore we have a number of targets to try and achieve to make the system run as smoothly as possible. 

Improving the Wi-fi signal, the picture quality and the sound quality are all things which hopefully will be optimized in the next few weeks. Improving the ease of operation (so that Giles can go home!) is also something we are hopeful of achieving. There is obviously a financial burden to all this even if we are as prudent as we can be but we believe this is being done for the glory of God and we will therefore endeavor to find whatever monies are needed to finance this new tool of spreading the news of God’s love for us all.

In the future, who knows? Recording and streaming of every Sunday Mass, every daily mass, the rosary said in church, stations of the cross, weddings, funerals? 

Who knows?

ST.TERESA’S PARISH PASTORAL COUNCIL 

MINUTES OF MEETING HELD VIA ZOOM ON 

THURSDAY 4TH FEBRUARY 2020

OPENING PRAYER 

PRESENT: Adam Bajkowski (chair), Fr. Chris Cousens, Deacon Bernard Ward, Lynsey Ankers, Alicia Owen, Barbara Nelson, Bernadette Richardson, Brian Ashcroft, Kay Donnellon, Martina Thorpe, Shane Doyle 

APOLOGIES FOR ABSENCE: 

Pat Le Bon

MINUTES OF MEETING 3RD FEBRUARY 2020

Taken as read and approved as correct: proposed by Bernard and seconded by Kay

MATTERS ARISING 

  1. Unfortunately Pat will no longer be able to continue in her role as a member of the PPC. She has been a valued, active member of the Council and on behalf of St Teresa’s Parish we offer her our deepest thanks and wish her all the best for the future. Her role as secretary will need to be filled by someone else. 
  2. Shane has sourced an electrician to correct the lighting problem in the church car park and will need access to the church. Father Chris will arrange access.
  3. A healing service with apostolic blessing and absolution is hoped to be offered in thanksgiving around the feast of Pentecost (last week July/first week August). This should be actively promoted. 
  4. Added technology to enhance worship since last PPC meeting: video projector screen is now up and running and available for helping worship. 

      Unexpectedly, and almost solely due to Giles Cook, one   of our parishioners , we have a new web page and live streaming capability. 

More details and progress regarding these will be published on the web page as things develop. 

5.   Refresher training for readers, and use of a DVD from the Catholic Faith Exploration group relating to the Gospels has been put on hold until after the Covid pandemic. 

6.   Apparently Ken Dennis, the Diocesan Property Manager who has to agree building work and its cost before it can go ahead has verbally stated that he would not be in favour of our proposed restorative work to the glass at the back of church which is bowing. 

It was decided that Bernard should get a formal response from him

7.   Following incidents in  church, Bernard is to look into the pros and cons of electric candles.

8.   The wealth of ideas put forward by the PPC subgroup in response to the church questionnaires needs to be discussed in depth when more time is available. It will therefore be held over until the next PPC meeting and will be the only item discussed. 

DATE OF NEXT MEETING (VIA ZOOM)

Thursday March 18th at 7pm